vofka88 ® 15-Jul-2015 19:45

Kees Kuiken- Diesel Engines I


Уважаемые моряки прошу прощения за ошибку недостающие страницы первой части находятся во второй части http://seatracker.ru/viewtopic.php?p=13207#13207! В ближайшее время будет исправлено. Чтобы найти где начинаются страницы первой части смотрите на номер части в левой верхней части страницы. Спасибо за понимание !
Year: 2008
Language: english
Author: Kees Kuiken
Genre: Technical
Publisher: Target Global Energy Training
ISBN: 9079104027
Format: PDF
Quality: Scanned pages
Number of pages: 509
Description: DIESEL ENGINES for ship propulsion and power plants FROM 0 TO 100,000 kW
For engineering, operating, and maintenance of diesel engines, enthusiastic, motivated, and well-trained technicians are essential for manufacturers, proprietors, and users of diesel engines.
Diesel engines play an important role in today’s society: we are quite dependent on them.
Over 100 years after Rudolf Diesel developed a working diesel engine, there is still no real alternative for ship propulsion and electric generators in tropical and/or remote areas.
The diesel engine is indispensable for road haulage, inland shipping, aquatics, electric power emergency systems, agriculture, and passenger transport by road or rail, oil and gas industry and various other industries. We have chosen to make use of many pictures accompanied by a written explanation.
Much highly in-depth technical theory has been omitted as these topics are covered by specialist books available on the market; these topics include thermodynamics, vibrations, materials, and electronics.
We, at Target Global Energy Training have opted for a more practical approach. This includes ample information with respect to the construction of engines, use of materials, various engine categories, maintenance, repairs, and the use of engines.
Much attention has been paid to the choice of proper graphic material. This, in our opinion, is helpful for the reader to gain insight in the various subjects. This publication is indispensable for every person who has dealings with the diesel engine industry, from the smallest engine to ‘The Cathedrals of the Oceans’.
At the special general meeting of the 60th anniversary of the VIV, de Vereniging van Importeurs van Verbrandingsmotoren (Association of Importers of Combustion Engines) at the ‘Theater aan het Vrijthof in Maastricht, author Kees Kuiken presents the first proof print to the chairman of the Association FME-CWM,
Mr. Jan Kamminga.
FME-CWM is the employers’ organization and trade association for the technological and industrial sector. The activities in the sector cover engineering, manufacturing, trade, industrial maintenance, and industrial automation. Some 2,750 organizations (metal, plastics, electronics and electro-technology), employing some 260,000 people, are members of FME.
Kees Kuiken, Onnen, The Netherlands, July 2008.

Contents

Introduction 5
1 The use of industrial diesel
engines 12
1.1 Introduction 14
1.2 Otto-process 15
1.3 Diesel-process 15
1.4 The use of Otto-engines 16
1.5 The use of Diesel-engines 16
1.6 Properties of both principles 17
2 Classification of diesel engines 18
2.1 Introduction 20
2.2 Working principle 20
2.3 Design 21
2.4 Speed of rotation 23
2.5 Power output or shaft power 26
2.6 Fuel used 26
2.7 Use of engines 28
2.8 Other characteristics of diesel
engines 29
2.9 The use of in-line and V-engines 30
2.10 Direction of rotation of the diesel
engine 31
2.11 Cylinder number 32
2.12 Natural aspiration and turbo-charging 32
3 Working principles of diesel
engines 36
3.1 Working principles 38
3.2 Two-stroke engine build 38
3.3 Four-stroke engine set-up 41
3.4 A few remarkable differences between the
two-stroke and four-stroke cycles 42
3.5 Examples of supply programmes of
engine manufacturers 44
3.6 Important terms and definitions 46
3.7 Some engine names 47
4 Efficiency and losses of diesel
engines
4.1 Efficiency and losses
4.2 Indicator diagram
4.3 Parameters of both working
principles
4.4 Determining cylinder output using
an indicator diagram and the mean
induced pressure
4.5 Determining the mean induced
pressure
4.6 Engine formula
4.7 Induced thermal efficiency
4.8 Mechanical and total efficiency
4.9 Specific fuel consumption
4.10 Mean effective pressure
4.11 Thermal energy balances or
Sankey-diagrams
4.12 Efficiencies of diesel-engine driven
power plants
4.13 More complex ship propulsion
4.14 Water pumps, dredging pumps,
crude-oil pumps, compressor drives
5 Standard figures of various
types of diesel engines
5.1 Mean effective pressure
5.2 Mean piston speed
5.3 Load parameters
5.4 Compression ratio
5.5 Power density
5.6 Number of revolutions of diesel
engines in relation to the size of the
stroke of an engine
5.7 RPM of generators
6 Construction of various types of
diesel engines 82
6.1 Category I: Industrial diesel engines
from 0 to 100 kW shaft power,
fuel M.D.O., four-stroke, high-speed
engines 84
6.2 Category II: Industrial diesel engines
from 100 to 5000 kW shaft power,
fuel M.D.O., four-stroke, high-speed
engines 87
6.3 Category III: Industrial diesel engines
from 500 to 30,000 kW shaft power,
fuel H.F.O., four-stroke, medium-
speed engines 91
6.4 Category IV: Industrial diesel engines
of 1500 to 100,000 kW shaft power,
fuel H.F.O., two-stroke with
crosshead, low-speed 99
7 Use of materials for diesel
engines 108
7.1 General use of materials 110
7.2 Cast iron 110
7.3 Steel 111
7.4 Cast steel 112
7.5 Forged steel 112
7.6 Steel alloys 112
7.7 Aluminium 113
7.8 Ceramic materials 114
7.9 Specific materials for engine parts;
engine classification according to
the four categories 114
7.10 Special finishes and heat treatments 121
7.11 Examples of modern material usage 124
8 Fuels, fuel-line systems and
fuel cleaning 132
8.1 Introduction 134
8.2 Composition of liquid fuels 134
8.3 Definition of heavy oil 135
8.4 Refining crude oil 135
8.5 Chemical composition of hydro-
carbon compounds 136
8.6 Standardisation of liquid fuels 136
8.7 Fuel properties 139
8.8 Additional fuel specifications 141
8.9 Decreasing the sulphur content in
fuels 145
8.10 Bunkering 146
8.11 Fuel-line systems according to the
engine classification 151
8.12 Modular fuel-treatment systems
8.13 Bunkering fuels
9 Fuel-injection systems
9.1 Introduction
9.2 Examples of injection times
9.3 Ignition delay
9.4 Partial-load conditions
9.5 Processes in the cylinder; injection,
ignition and combustion
9.6 The four phases by Ricardo
9.7 Ignition delay; causes
9.8 Nature of atomisation
9.9 Ignition quality of the fuel
9.10 Examples of combustion processes
9.11 Injection pressure and droplet size
9.12 Injection principles
9.13 Shape of the combustion chamber
9.14 Fuel-injection mechanism: fuel pump
9.15 Fuel-capacity adjustments
9.16 Working of a plunger pump
9.17 Valve-controlled fuel pumps
9.18 Common-rail system
9.19 Injector system
9.20 Fuel injectors
9.21 Residual-pressure valves
9.22 Cavitation
9.23 Fuel-injection characteristics
10 Cooling diesel engines
10.1 Introduction
10.2 Cooling agents for diesel engines
10.3 Cooling-water treatment
10.4 Corrosion
10.5 Products for cooling-water
treatment
10.6 Cooling-water treatment products,
brands
10.7 Cleaning cooling-water systems
contaminated with oil
10.8 Bacteriological contamination
10.9 Testing cooling water
10.10 Macro-biological prevention in
seawater-cooling systems
10.11 Design of cooling-water systems
10.12 Cooling-water system defects
10.13 Damaged engine parts
10.14 Standard cooling-water system
10.15 Examples of cooling methods for
engine parts
10.16 Examples according to the engine
classification
10.17 Combustion-air cooling 275
10.18 Special cooling systems 278
10.19 Pipe coolers and plate coolers 279
10.20 Cooling systems in a diesel-power
plant 281
10.21 Cogeneration systems 282
10.22 Summary cooling-water systems 283
11 Lubrication of engines 284
11.1 Introduction 286
11.2 The purpose of lubrication 286
11.3 Three types of lubrication 286
11.4 Engine parts that require lubrication
and cooling 288
11.5 Common lubricating-oil system 289
11.6 Examples of lubricating-oil systems
in accordance with the classification 293
11.7 Lubricating-oil properties 301
11.8 Cleaning lubricating oil 304
11.9 Lubricating-oil analysis 310
12 Air supply 312
12.1 Introduction 314
12.2 The amount of air 314
12.3 Air supply to the engine 315
12.4 Principle of turbo-charging 317
12.5 Turbo-blower manufacturers 319
12.6 Capacity curves 323
12.7 Representation of three turbo-
blower manufacturers -
development of modern turbo-
blowers 325
12.8 Small turbo-blowers - Engine
categories I and II 327
12.9 Supercharger with a separate power
turbine 330
12.10 Air supply in four-stroke engines 331
12.11 Air supply in two-stroke crosshead
engines 336
12.12 Supercharging in two-stroke
crosshead engines 340
12.13 Some important points of interest
with regard to the air supply in
diesel engines 343
12.14 Maintenance of turbo-blowers 346
12.15 Problems with supercharging 349
13 Driving gears
13.1 Introduction
13.2 Driving gear of four-stroke diesel
engines
13.3 Engine-driving gears in two-stroke
crosshead engines
13.4 Thrust blocks and thrust bearings
14 Starting systems of diesel
engines
14.1 Introduction
14.2 Starting methods
14.3 Reversing the engine
15 Speed control
15.1 Introduction
15.2 Summary
15.3 Types of governors
15.4 Examples of engine configurations
with different types of governors
15.5 Theoretical background of speed
governors
16 Noise, origin and damping
16.1 Introduction
16.2 Origin of noise in diesel engines
16.3 Sound transmission paths
16.4 Silencers for diesel engines -
Choosing a silencer
16.5 Noise reduction of diesel engines in
categories I and II
16.6 Turbo-blower noise
16.7 Sound levels in diesel engines
16.8 Examples of the engine arrangement
with silencers
17 Vibrations and Balancing
17.1 Introduction
17.2 Main causes of vibration
17.3 Resonance
17.4 Forces exerted on the driving gear
and engine block
17.5 Principle of an internal combustion
engine
17.6 Forces in a two-stroke crosshead
engine
17.7 Tangential force diagram
17.8 Vibrations in engine frame and
propeller shaft 449
17.9 Degree of cyclic irregularity 464
17.10 Balancing diesel engines 465
17.11 Resultant forces and moments in the
engine block 465
17.12 External forces and moments 466
17.13 Example of the balancing used in a
Wartsila 9 L 46 four-stroke engine -
category III 471
17.14 Balancing of V-engines 478
17.15 Balancing examples for two-stroke
crosshead engines - category IV 479
17.16 Shaft generators in two-stroke
crosshead engines 485
17.17 Axial vibrations 486
17.18 Vibration numbers and orders 487
17.19 Vibration level, acceptable values 488
17.20 Vibration frequencies
17.21 Methods to reduce torsional
vibration by means of dampers
17.22 Examples of engine-frame tearing
17.23 Measurements for vibration dampers
17.24 Vibration energy
17.25 Example 1: Adjusting the engine
speed in case of damaged cylinder
liners
17.26 Example 2
17.27 Example 2, on five cylinders
17.28 Design of a propulsion installation
17.29 Effects of vibration frequencies
17.30 Measuring equipment
17.31 Mass-inertia moment of a flywheel
17.32 Examples of crankshafts, either with
or without counterweights
17.33 Combustion forces exerted on the

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Во всех предыдущих раздачах эта книга не содержала многих страниц, в этом же варианте все страницы ( Спасибо ! papasha с форума morehod ) Во всех предыдущих раздачах эта книга не содержала многих страниц, в этом же варианте все страницы ( Спасибо ! papasha с форума morehod ).
Rating: 4.9 / 5 (Votes: 63)
Reply
zxc 17-Jan-2016 15:21
Только заметил что во второй части 503 страницы http://seatracker.ru/viewtopic.php?t=6247
Хотя должно быть 443. Возможно я туда влепил страницы из первой части Woll
Сегодня займусь переделкой обоих частей
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Reply
maximus_lt 30-Jan-2018 18:54
Как вы определили год издания ? Есть похожая, но год не найду на страницах.
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GOOGLE BOT 30-Jan-2018 18:54
 
shcherbakov 13-Feb-2018 16:47
38151Как вы определили год издания ?
например в introduction автор подписал "июль, 2008"
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Diesel Engines II - Kees Kuiken [2008, PDF]
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