NNT ® 28-Oct-2015 13:42
This research aims to examine whether the disintegration of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War are the primary reasons for the rebirth of maritime piracy. This question has largely been left overlooked in contemporary academic literature.
The research examines the hypothesis that after the end of the Cold War, commercial sea routes have become as dangerous as they were in the Middle Ages, due to the changes in the international sociopolitical situation. Globalization and increase of the shipping traffic, the end of the sponsorship of the client states which weakened hegemony of the state in many Third World countries, proliferation of the small arms and partly due to the lapses in surveillance and control of the oceans that the West and the East have imposed during the Cold War, as well as due geographical, social, cultural and economic factors which are not directly connected to the changed post Cold War environment – all that may be the causes of the increase of the piracy.
The research examines two case studies. The first is the analysis of current situation in Somalia/Gulf of Aden. It attempts to seek out the roots and causative factors of piracy in the region and proposes management decisions on how to uproot it. The second case study analyzes the successful war on piracy in the Malacca Strait/Indonesia, which has brought to the triumph of the rule of law. It derives lessons from this successful initiative. The work also takes into account lessons of the past and analyzes piracy from the cultural angle.
There are two main conclusions made at the end of this research. The first is that the end of the Cold War is accountable for the appearance of many causative factors for contemporary maritime piracy and armed robbery. The second is that in order to succeed, the war on piracy in Somalia must be different than in Southeast Asia, and will require ground operations in order to restore law and order at sea.
Attachments ThesisTzvi29.07.2012.pdf (3 MB, Downloaded: 346 times)
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